Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Is the Black Lives Matter Movement Libertarian?

Allan Greig/foter.com(Reason Magazine)
"Activists from Black Lives Matter have launched an initiative called "Campaign Zero," which seeks to bring down the number of people killed by police in the U.S. each year. The initiative includes ten proposals for reform that would help make that happen. Those are: 1) End Broken Windows Policing, 2) Community Oversight, 3) Limit Use of Force, 4) Independently Investigate & Prosecute, 5) Community Representation, 6) Body Cameras, 7) Training, 8) End for-profit policing, 9) Demilitarization, 10) Fair police union contracts. 
Each of the policy proposals is explained in more detail at JoinCampaignZero.org. Among the proposals, activists suggest decriminalizing marijuana and the public consumption of alcohol. Several of the policy proposals (like an end to broken windows policing and an end to for-profit policing) will be impossible without engaging and interrogating the value of petty law enforcement, which disproportionately affects the poor. Things like "community representation" may make this harder—despite the rhetoric, the kinds of petty laws that can lead to questionable police shootings are generally supported in the communities where they're enforced. "Quality of life" laws, the kind that pit police officers against peaceful residents doing something other residents may not approve of, enjoy broad support among voters. That's why the laws are there. "

Read the full article HERE.

Sunday, August 2, 2015

CHE Sadaphal — The Black Libertarian Case Against Voter ID Laws

The libertarian physician and minister, in his latest article, "Voter ID: Bias or Necessity", ask this crucial question: are voter ID laws racially biased or completely benign and necessary for the enhancement of our democracy?
He writes: "On July 13th, a federal trial began in Winston-Salem over the 2013 North Carolina law (H.B. 589) that repealed a series of voting access measures—such as same-day voter registration, early voting, pre-registration for eligible high school students and out-of-precinct voting—that were enacted over the last two decades. The law also required a voter ID, or photographic identification, for everyone voting in person. As The New York Times recently reported:
Lawmakers claimed that H.B. 589, which was approved in a sneaky last-minute maneuver that insulated it from any real debate, would reduce fraud and inefficiency in elections. In truth, it is a pile of blatantly discriminatory measures that lawmakers knew would make voting harder, if not impossible, for many lower-income citizens — who are disproportionately black and Latino, and many of whom tend to vote Democratic. The election-law scholar Richard Hasen has called it “the most sweeping anti-voter law in at least decades.”"

How to Stop Brutality-Adjacent Policing

We need to train police officers to be “guardians,” not warriors.

     Tony Webster/Flickr

(The American Conservative)
What happened to Sandra Bland? This is a question many Americans (particularly, and rightfully, black American women) are asking, following the death of a young civil rights activist in a Waller County, Texas jail cell two weeks ago. Was any of it—her arrest after a traffic stop by state trooper Brian Encinia, her three-day detention, the neglect that resulted in her alleged suicide by hanging—legal?
Bland’s death remains under investigation, but the dashboard camera footage of her interaction with Encinia shows the escalation of a warning for the failure to signal into the forceful detention of an epileptic woman. Surprisingly, much of what occurred between Encinia and Bland appears to have been legal, if imprudent. Encinia’s tactics could be called “brutality-adjacent policing,” in which the standard for behavior is the bare legal minimum rather than actively good policing.

Friday, July 31, 2015

Reginald Kaigler — SUPER MONOPOLIES in Healthcare! Anthem targets Cigna! Aetna Buys Humana!

My commentary on how Obamacare is creating monopolies in the U.S. health insurance industry, the Chinese economy struggling, U.S. government propaganda to convince Americans that the economy has recovered. 

 

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Black Libertarian Responds to #AllLivesMatter Campaign

Akil Alleyne, a black Libertarian lawyer and writer, takes issue with those pushing the #AllLivesMatter campaign.

Alex Ndungu Njeru ― For Africa, Lessons From Hong Kong And The Umbrella Revolution



(Source: AfricanLiberty.com)

The African libertarian writer on lessons learned from Hong Kong's economic success: "They have it all; economic freedom, one of the highest Gross Domestic Product per capita in the world (53,203 US$D), the infrastructure is perfect and systems work like clockwork. So why are the Hong Kong citizens agitating for electoral reform and political freedom? In relative terms most citizens of repressed countries in the world would give up everything to be where Hong Kong residents are at, take citizens of North Korea or Venezuela for example and the development and freedoms that residents of Hong Kong enjoy. The Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong is teaching us pertinent lessons about human nature. The struggle gives life to popular phrase that ‘the cost of freedom is eternal vigilance.’ The nature of man is that he wants it all, give a man the earth and he will want the universe, give him the universe and he will seek the multi-verse and the unknown."
He continues his commentary: "That it is what it is in Hong Kong, the residents have reaped dividend from economic freedom, now they want to reap dividend from political freedom. Are they sure that political freedom will deliver dividends sweet or bitter? No they are not; they want the freedom to explore the unknown. Creation theory has it that Adam and Eve were banished from the garden of Eden because of the quest to gain the knowledge that ensues from freedom. The Hong Kong Umbrella revolution is emblematic of the human development process and the natural state of man, ‘man naturally seeks freedom.’"
Read the full article HERE.

Sunday, July 19, 2015

George B. N. Ayittey | The New Path for Africa: Establishing Free-Market Societies


Why has Africa, despite its rich history, cultures, and abundant resources, largely remained in the grip of dictatorship, starvation, genocide and war? How can this tragic legacy of colonialism, socialism, and plutocracy be replaced with the welfare of economic liberalization, individual rights, and the Rule of Law? Based on his new book, "Africa in Chaos," award-winning economist George Ayittey will examine the record of American statism and the revolution for free-market societies. 

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Japheth J. Omojuwa ― Why Government Fails In Nigeria

The Office of The Citizen and Why Government Fails In Nigeria – Japheth J. Omojuwa


The Nigerian libertarian explains why Government is failing Africa's largest economy: "In January 2013, a few Nigerian citizens got emails about the danger of abandoning Bagega, a lead poisoned village in Zamafara unremediated. There was the danger of losing at least 1500 children to lead poisoning, not to mention the attendant danger to adults. There was meant to be a reason to fear for the lives of residents of Bagega as they had been  promised a quick remediation process when the president Dr. Goodluck Jonathan said money would be released for the purpose. Nothing happened for about 10 months. Bagega residents had been living through lead poison for at least 2 years. Then these citizens bought into the idea of saving Bagega, launched a Twitter hashtag #SaveBagega, got the phone numbers of certain Senators and Lawmakers, got the buy-in of a major Senator. The Twitter campaign was intense, the phone calls never stopped. In just less than 3 days, the FG released the money for the remediation of Bagega. The remediation happened. Children got saved. Change happened. All of this under the same government that never really cared. What really changed? Ordinary citizens became active citizens. They activated change by using the government to do what it was meant to do but left undone for years.

He continues his commentary: The formation of Enough Is Enough Nigeria happened through the same process. A President was ill and was dying, a Vice President needed to be made acting President to keep the state running. In a sane democracy, that would have happened automatically. Nigeria’s situations often come with a few drops of insanity and this had loads of it. A power cabal refused to let the VP become acting president citing technicalities in the departure of the president. The president never handed over to the acting president when he made the journey abroad to Saudi Arabia for treatment. Again, ordinary citizens got together. They were young, they were mostly meeting one another for the first time. They agonized, then organized, then marched. In Lagos and Abuja. That accident birth EIE Nigeria. It was a birth necessitated by the needs of the Nigerian society. The doctrine of necessity happened at the Nigerian National Assembly,Goodluck Jonathan, then powerless and redundant Vice President soon became Acting President. When he eventually became the President following the eventual death of President Yar’Adua in May of 2010, it was a smooth transition but only because the battle had been won weeks before. Won mostly by ordinary citizens taking the role of the citizen, playing to the responsibility of the active citizen, acting in the office of the modern day active citizen."

Read more: http://www.africanliberty.org/the-office-of-the-citizen-and-why-government-fails-in-nigeria-japheth-j-omojuwa/